Even Churches Want To See Drugs Legalised!

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Even Churches Want To See Drugs Legalised!

The War on Drugs has got so preposterous, that even churches are calling for its end!

We all know the War on Drugs is a failure, and it seems that members of the church are also beginning to think so as well. During the New England Conference of United Methodist Churches, a resolution was passed which uses Christian principles to call for an end to the War on Drugs.

The resolution itself goes into great detail on just how badly the War on Drugs has failed to achieve its underlying goal of harm reduction and stemming drug abuse. It even details how it has achieved the opposite, increasing the spread of death, needle-borne disease, an industry of incarceration, increased violence, and creating a negative impact on communities.

Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organisation committed to fighting a history of failed drug policy, was also present at the conference.

“When I came off the stage I was met by many assembly members telling me how important the resolution was,” said Lt. Cole, a member of LEAP. “One said that…I had described his family. His daughter died ten years ago of a drug overdose and he and his wife were left to raise her two children. That gentleman was sure that if drugs had been legal his daughter would not have died.”

Major Neill Franklin was also there to see the conference, stating “Jesus concerned himself with the plight of the poor and marginalized in his society. In our society, the story of the poor and marginalized is one of mass incarceration, racial injustice, and the breakdown of families caused by the War on Drugs.”

The proceedings surrounding the resolution ended with a powerful declaration, and support for the work of LEAP:

“Be it Resolved: That the New England Annual Conference supports seeking means other than prohibition to address the problem of substance abuse; and is further resolved to support the mission of the international educational organization Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) to reduce the multitude of unintended harmful consequences resulting from fighting the war on drugs and to lessen the incidence of death, disease, crime, and addiction by ending drug prohibition.”

It is great to see religious bodies calling for an end to the War on Drugs. No matter your views on religion, it holds an influential sway, and is an integral part of many people’s lives. For it to actually preach a peaceful end to what has been a catastrophic war is heart-warming and powerful at the same time.