Here Are The Top 10 Smoke Spots in The Netherlands

Published :
Categories : Art & CultureBlogCannabisTop lists
Last edited :

Cannabis Smoking Spots Netherlands


Join us as we take an in-depth look at the best smoke spots in the Netherlands, including everything from art galleries and museums to national parks.

The Netherlands is often considered one of the top holiday destinations for cannabis connoisseurs, boasting world-famous coffee shops and a relatively liberal stance on cannabis and other recreational drug use.

But just where should one go to enjoy a special smoke in a country where you can literally light up anywhere?

In this article, we’re going to share our handpicked list of the best smoke spots in The Netherlands. Whether you love strolling through museums and art exhibitions or relaxing out in nature, there’s something for every kind of stoner here.

So, keep reading, and remember to bookmark our blog for more articles like this.

TOP TEN SMOKE SPOTS IN THE NETHERLANDS

10. CANALS AREA UTRECHT

Utrecht is a lively university city that attracts thousands of tourists from all corners of the globe all throughout the year. And it’s not hard to see why.

Smoking Cannabis Canals Utrecht

This dynamic city has it all, from trendy nightlife venues and great restaurants to awe-inspiring museums and stunning architecture, including medieval churches and beautiful houses by the water.

The city’s canals area is particularly pintoresque, complete with countless outdoor cafes, and makes for a great, peaceful place for a smoke.

We recommend lighting up and taking a walk along the canals to discover the heart of the city. Start at the Architectuurcentrum Aorta (on Ganzenmarkt) and head south along the city’s main canal.

You can head as far down south as Tolsteegbrug, where you can cross the bridge and then head east along the Stadsbuitengracht canal, all the way to Park Lepelenburg.

Alternatively, head north from the Architectuurcentrum Aorta until you get to Lange Viestraat. Turn left and follow the street for a few blocks until you get to the Vredenburg market where you can check out local goods and craft.

Or, if you prefer to head out with no real plan, simply pick one of the canals and start walking. If you’re not Dutch or familiar in Utrecht, you can ask some locals for tips on where to go or simply get lost along the city’s cobblestone streets. Just make sure to keep a map or satnav handy.

9. DELTA WORKS ZEELAND

The Delta Works (Deltawerken) is a series of construction projects built in the 1950s to shorten the Dutch coastline and protect several areas from flooding.

These initiatives were taken after the 1953 North Sea Flood, a natural disaster that struck the coasts of the Netherlands, England, Belgium, and Scotland. Water rose to over 5m above mean sea level in some areas.

The effects of the flood were worst in the Netherlands, a country with 20% of its territory below mean sea level and 50% less than 1 metre above sea level. The floods caused over 1800 recorded deaths and widespread damage.

The Delta Works at Deltapark Neeltje Jans, a theme park located at the foot of the largest storm surge barrier in the world, documents the struggle of the Dutch against nature during the North Sea Flood.

The show is presented in the form of a panoramic 3D animation that allows visitors to experience the devastating power and force of water, and documents the effects of the largest post-war disaster to hit the Netherlands.

Visitors will also get the chance to visit the world’s largest storm surge barrier, built to reduce the risk of flooding to once in 4,000 years (previously once in 80 years in 1953).

The structure is constructed from concrete with a 200-year guarantee, and features stunning steel doors that measure 45m wide, designed to control the level of the tides.

The Delta Works and storm surge barrier make for a great smoke spot where you can relax and reflect on the force of nature and the struggle that people faced in 1953. Plus, you’ll also be left in awe by the impressive storm surge barrier, and all the other informational material on hand at the park.

To make the most of this experience, we recommend reading up on the North Sea Flood prior to your visit. For some useful info and references on the event, check out its Wikipedia page.

8. ESCHER IN THE PALACE

Escher in The Palace is a permanent exhibition dedicated to the incredible work by M. C. Escher.

Escher was a Dutch graphic artist renowned for making woodcuts, lithographs and mezzotints that inspired and impressed people all over the world.

His work was inspired by mathematics and featured tessellations, platonics, hyperbolic geometry, impossible objects and optical illusions. His work also explored multiple levels of reality, and was often inspired by mental images rather than direct observations.

MC Escher Cannabis

The Escher in The Palace exhibition is held within the Escher Museum in the Lange Voorhout Palace in The Hague.

The palace was originally constructed as a mansion for Anthony Patras, a deputy to the States General of the Netherlands, by the architect Pieter de Swart.

The palace, dating back to the early 19th century, boasts a strong, royal ambience and a rich history, serving as the royal residence of Prince Henry, Princess Sophie of The Netherlands, and many other members of Dutch royalty.

The palace, located in the heart of The Hague, makes for a perfect smoke spot. As smoking inside is prohibited, we suggest lighting up outside, kicking back and simply taking in the sights and sounds of the city before heading inside the museum to get lost in all of Escher’s most prized creations and take in the essence of this historic building.

The exhibition features everything from Escher’s most famous works, such as “Day and Night,” to his earlier pieces, including Italian landscapes , studies of Moorish mosaics and much more.

For more information about the Lange Voorhout palace or the exhibition, click here.

7. MADURODAM

Madurodam is another one of Holland’s most iconic attractions that makes for a great, fun-filled smoke spot. We recommend lighting up before exploring the park and its various attractions.

The park was first opened in 1952 and has since attracted tens of millions of visitors. It features a vast variety of 1:25 scale model replicas of famous Dutch landmarks, cities, and other developments.

Cannabis Madurodam

The park was created thanks to the help of Mrs B. Boon-van der Starp, a member of foundation for the Dutch Students Sanatorium, a sanatorium offering tuberculosis treatments to students.

The sanatorium was in need of financial support when van der Starp heard about the success of Bekonscot, a miniature park in Beaconsfield, England which donated a large part of its profits to a hospital in London.

Van der Starp received the fund to create the park from the family of George Maduro, a Jewish law student from Curaçao who fought the Nazi occupation forces during WWII as a member of the Dutch Resistance, who wanted to build the park as a memorial to their son.

The park was designed by architect S. J. Bouma and built in 1952. Bouma’s theme for the park was “het stadje met de glimlach,” or “the little city with the smile”. Today, all of the proceeds from the park go to a variety of Dutch charities.

Madurodam now features 3 different themed areas: City Centre, Water World and Innovation Island. The first shows the evolution of Dutch cities; the second explores how The Netherlands deals with water, both as a friend and foe; and the third is a homage to the nation’s innovative and entrepreneurial spirit.

For more information about Madurodam and its many attractions, visit the park’s website.

6. KOP VAN ZUID

Kop Van Zuid is a popular neighborhood located on the south bank of the New Meuse river, a distributary channel branching off from the Rhine, in Rotterdam. It is located right in the heart of the Rotterdam Port, one of the busiest ports in the world.

It makes for a great smoke spot, especially for fans of architecture or anyone looking for panoramic views of the city.

It’s home to a variety of landmarks, including modern buildings such as De Rotterdam, constructed in 2013, and the World Port Center, as well as a variety of historic constructions, including the Hotel New York (finalized in 1903), as well as Entrepotgebouw and Poortgebouw, both of which date back to 1879.

Some of the buildings erected in this neighborhood were designed by some of the world’s most famous architects, including Álvaro Siza, Renzo Piano, Francine Houben, Norman Foster, and Rotterdam's own Rem Koolhaas.

Kop Van Zuid features a strong juxtaposition between two very different times in European history. The Cruise Terminal, for example, serves as the anchoring point for the world’s most luxurious and modern liners and provides stunning views of the Maas river, while the Hotel New York (previously home to the head offices of the Holland America line) reminisces of the area of Dutch Immigration to the US.

We recommend enjoying an afternoon smoke here and spending some time getting lost in Kop Van Zuid’s cracks and crevices. There’s a lot to be discovered; many of the old warehouses in the area now house cultural institutes such as art galleries or renowned restaurants.

Finally, don’t miss a trip to the Cruise Terminal for great views of the water and the city skyline, or consider taking one of the many boat cruises for an incredible trip to the heart of one of the busiest ports in the world.

5. EFTELING

If you’re looking to enjoy a smoke and escape into a magical fantasy world, this is the perfect place for you.

The Efteling is a fantasy-themed park located in Kaatsheuvel. Many of the attractions are based on old folklore, myths, and legends commonly told in the Netherlands.

Cannabis efteling

The park was opened in 1952 and featured a children's playground and fantasy forest designed by Anton Pieck, a Dutch illustrator, and filmmaker Peter Reijnders.

The forest brought to life over 10 different fairy tales using original drawings and designs by Pieck, as well as mechanics and sound/lighting effects designed by Reijnders.

In its first year, Efteling reeled in over 240,000 visitors.

Park expansions began in 1978 to include rides/rollercoaster and a variety of other attractions for both children and adults, including hotels, a golf course, a theatre, and a holiday village.

The park is open year round (previously it only opened in the warmer months of the year) and features a special winter event (Winter Efteling), complete with Christmas lights, holiday displays, ice skating rink and much more.

Today, the Efteling is the largest theme park in The Netherlands and one of the oldest in the world. It is twice the size of the original Disneyland in California and attracts over 4 million visitors annually.

The park is located roughly 1 hour and 15 minutes from Amsterdam. We suggest taking a train to Tilburg station and then catching a connecting bus to the park. Either enjoy a smoke on the way or upon arriving and get ready to lose yourself in this magical wonderland.

Tickets can be pricey, but you can easily spend an entire day (or more) exploring the park. For more information and to book your tickets, visit the park’s website here.

4. FORT SINT PIETER

Fort Sint Pieter is another one of our favourite smoke spots in the Netherlands. Whether you just want to kick back and take in the sites or embark on one of the underground tours, this place is sure to have something for you.

Fort Sint Pieter is an ancient fortress Located on the northern flank of Mount Saint Peter. The plateau, elevated roughly 170m above sea level, runs from Maastricht in the Netherlands through to Belgium.

Mount Saint Pieter (Sint-Pietersberg) is a popular place for students and locals to hang during the warmer months and also serves as a popular tourist attraction that attracts visitors from all parts of the world.

You can either kick back on the mount and enjoy the views of the surrounding areas, stroll down into some of the nearby villages, or take part in one of the many tours and activities organized inside the fortress and caves.

Tours include visits to air shelters used during the second World War, as well as excursions to the Northern Caves, Casemates, the fortress and more.

Maastricht Underground, the company that organizes excursions and activities in the area also run a variety of group games, including underground treasure hunts, labyrinths and much more.

While you may not be keen to crawl inside one of the spooky tunnels, we definitely recommend at least enjoying a smoke outside of the fortress and making the most of the elevated views of the surrounds, especially early in the morning or in the afternoon.

Note that tours and activities generally have to be booked in advance. For more info and bookings, click here.

3. DOM TOWER

The Dom Tower is the tallest church tower in the Netherlands (standing 112 metres tall) and makes for one of our all-time favorites places to relax and enjoy a smoke.

Located in the heart of Utrecht, the Gothic-style tower has become one of the most popular landmarks in the city.

Dom Tower Cannabis

The Dom Tower was built between 1321 and 1382 and previously formed part of the Cathedral of Saint Martin, also known as Dom Church.

The entire cathedral was never finished due to a lack of funding and, in 1674, its unfinished nave collapsed, leaving behind the lone standing tower we see today.

Visitors have the possibility to explore the tower both inside and out, as well as climb to its peak via 465 steps and take in the stunning views of the historic city of Utrecht.

We recommend chilling out in Dom Square and taking in the stunning design of the tower from a distance before heading inside and climbing to the top. Once up there, light up and enjoy the views.

For visiting hours, prices, and a full rundown of the towers rich history, click here.

2. VONDEL PARK

If you’re looking for a green escape to kick back and enjoy a peaceful smoke in the heart of the bustling city of Amsterdam, Vondel Park is the perfect destination.

Opened in 1865, the park was original named Nieuwe Park before being renamed after the the 17th-century playwright and poet Joost van den Vondel. In 1936 a rose garden was built inside the park, followed by children's playground in the 1960s, and even an open-air theatre in 1980.

During the 60s and 70s, the park became a kind of “anything goes” place. By 2008, it was planned that adults would be allowed to legally have sex in the park (as long as they stayed away from the playground and took their rubbish with them) but the necessary legislature was never passed.

Today, the park serves as one of the main attractions in Amsterdam, and is loved by both tourists and locals, attracting over 10 million visitors per year. It’s a great place to watch people, meet locals, cycle, and, of course, enjoy a relaxing smoke.

The combined size of the park is 120 acres and features a variety of bars and restaurants where you can get a bite to eat once the munchies kick in.

1. HOGE VELUWE

Lastly, our number 1 all-time favorite smoke spot in the Netherlands is the Hoge Veluwe, a stunning national park located in the province of Gelderland.

Combining over 55 square kilometres, this park offers the perfect escape for nature lovers. From sand dunes to big, open plains, the Hoge Veluwe boasts diverse landscapes that house a variety of native fauna and flora.

 Smoking cervo

Fans of bird/animal watching will have the rare chance to lay their eyes on everything from Red Deer and foxes to Black Woodpeckers and grouse. The different landscapes in the park also house unique ecosystems complete with a variety of trees, plants, toadstools, lichens and much more.

Anyone looking for a cultural experience will also be well cared for; the inside of the park houses two museums and a variety of art and sculptures.

The Kröller-Müller Museum, for example, houses the art collection of the Kröller-Müller couple and includes numerous important works by artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Odilon Redon, Georges-Pierre Seurat, Auguste Rodin and Piet Mondrian.

Meanwhile, the Jachthuis Sint Hubertus museum provides a rare glimpse into the lives of the Kröller-Müllers through their iconic country residence.

The park also offers a variety of activities and workshops, including cycling as well as children’s activities. Alternatively, you’re also free to explore the park on your own or with a guided tour.

Whichever way you choose to explore the park, make sure you make the most of this relaxing getaway by sitting down to enjoy a smoke and really take in the stunning surroundings.

For more information about the park, opening hours, and special events, click here.

 

         
  Steven Voser  

Written by: Steven Voser
Steven Voser is an Emmy Award Nominated freelance journalist with a lot of experience under his belt. Thanks to a passion for all things cannabis, he now dedicates a lot of his times exploring the world of weed.

 
 
      Find out about our writers  

Related Products