Uruguay Delays Legal Cannabis Until 2015

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Uruguay Delays Legal Cannabis Until 2015

Although Uruguay legalised cannabis in December 2013, the new law has yet to be implemented, and it now has been delayed until 2015.

José Mujica, Uruguay’s president and main driving force behind the legalisation of cannabis, had hoped to see sales begin this year. Unfortunately, troubles implementing the law have seen the schedule of sale be set back to 2015.

Government planning and delays

The reasons behind the delay stem from the fact that the entire supply chain, from growth to sale, will be overseen by the state. This means for the roll out of legal sales must be done in one big go, which requires a lot of planning, and unfortunately, delays.

Since legalising cannabis back in 2013, Uruguay became the progressive poster child of the legalization movement. And although it is still a great achievement to have ended prohibition, “practical complications” are making things move slower than originally hoped.

Under the new(ish) law, only residents of Uruguay aged 18 and over will actually be able to purchase legal bud, and government regulations will limit the THC content of any strain sold to 15%.

Uruguayans have other ways to get legal weed

Not everything has come to a complete standstill though. Although legal sales are taking their time to be implemented, there are two other avenues of obtaining legal marijuana available to residents of Uruguay. Firstly, legalisation will allow residents of Uruguay to grow up to six cannabis plants themselves (per household), with a maximum cap of 480 grams of harvest per year.

Secondly, the new legislation has allowed for the first legal cannabis clubs to be set up. The Association of Cannabis Studies of Uruguay have begun the process of registering, and will see the group become the first recognised cannabis growing club, able to grow and supply to its own members.

With this new legislation it is hoped that Uruguay will be able to curb organised drug crime that plagues so many of its neighboring Latin American countries. Let’s hope things can continue to move forward, and show the world exactly why they should be reforming drug laws themselves.