Cannabis cancer research - trials on Humans set to begin soon

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Cannabis cancer research - trials on Humans set to begin soon

Study after study shows how beneficial cannabinoids can be for a variety of ailments. Yet, most have looked at in-vitro environments only, not on human beings. That is about to change.

Study after study shows how beneficial cannabinoids can be for a variety of ailments. Yet, most have looked at in-vitro environments only, not on human beings. That is about to change.

At this point, there are hundreds of studies, that show cannabis has the potential to be the cancer drug of choice. Particularly CBD has shown strong anti-tumour activity, which has been successfully employed to slow down, and even fully stop cancer in its tracks. However, all clinical studies so far have only looked at the effects of cannabinoids in in-vitro studies, not on human beings. This situation has left cancer patients looking into cannabis oil in a difficult situation; there are clinical in-vitro studies, and anecdotal stories of people curing their cancers. But solid human based research is still lacking.

A team at the California Pacific Medical Centre headed by Dr. Sean McAllister is now planning to do just that - clinical trials on humans. McAllister has spent the last decade studying the effects of CBD on aggressive types of brain and breast cancer in animals. His finding significantly conclude that CBD is effective at slowing down cancer, and that human testing is warranted.

Pierre Desprez & Sean McAllister

Pierre Desprez & Sean McAllister

Not an easy process

Preforming clinical trials on humans with a prohibited and controversial drug has its obstacles - it is an very lengthy and costly process. McAllister and his team are ready to go, but they still need to find a backer who is willing to fund the process. It may be harder than thought to find the financial means, as governments are not keen on funding projects that are likely to prove wrong decades of their own propaganda. Dr. McAllister is not disheartened, and he anticipates having everything up and running within a year.

Another of McAllister’s studies demonstrates how both THC and CBD work in tandem to reduce the effects of glioblastoma – the most common form of aggressive brain cancer, creating even stronger positive result than CBD on its own. THC is a psychoactive cannabinoid found within cannabis, and although it has been shown to exhibit anti-tumours activity, scientists still are reluctant to use it – even McAllister is focusing on CBD due to the high THC induces. But the avoidance of THC might be what really highlighted the healing properties of CBD.

McAllister and his team are not the only ones now exploring the potential of the use of cannabinoids to treat cancer. GW Pharmaceuticals is now recruiting for human clinical trials in Europe to test the cannabis based synthetic cannabinoid drug, Sativex, as an additional treatment for sufferers of glioblastoma. Before they can go ahead and do large scale clinical trials into the matter, they must first prove that it is safe to use with a small number of glioblastoma patients.